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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
and in the obama administration for political reasons hav they have not wanteo release that regulation. so eve on youth and has gone as a nonprofit out to try to digitize the vital records, make that accessible to driver's license issuing agencies, and any other agency that needs it. it's the one piece of real id that has not come in well. and the states have complained that it is a cost issue. and i would love to hear your response to the issue of the cost of eve. because her us on the 9/11 commission's ipod, checking against that fraud of the birth certificate is one of the most vital things you can do is to check the vital records. he has done a tremendous job in digitizing those records, the ones i've gotten have been tremendous. what exactly are the issues with the states in terms of not implementing that these are real id? >> well, let me pashtun exactly. i'll just give you a delaware perspective of eve. and i think was alluded to before, it is extreme complicated where you have, we have a known number of jurisdictions issuing driver's license. there so many different levels of technolog
connell. >> some have said it was it was indelicate of me to suggest that our top political priority over the next two years should be to deny president obama a second term. but the fact is, if our primary legislative goals are to repeal and replace the health spending bill, to end the bailouts, cut spending and shrink the size and scope of government, the only way to do all of those things is to put someone in the white house who won't veto any of these things. >> after that, democrats worried republicans were trying to annihilate the democratic party, in part by trying to destroy unions, the most vivid example of that, wisconsin. the republican governor successfully pushed a bill that stripped collective bargaining rights for most public unions. ohio and michigan followed scott walker's lead with mixed success. and now it seems the tables have turned. now if you believe boehner, the democrats want to annihilate the gop. so the talkback question for you, do you agree with boehner? will obama try to annihilate the republican party?, or tweet me @carolcnn. i'll be right back.
it. we want to hear him say climate change and science deniers, it sets up a huge political battle over the head of the e.p.a. >> it's not just obama. the failure of cap and trade was through the congress, not just republicans but democrats in congress. they had ties to coal, nuclear et cetera. i feel like the debate is moving, but it's like the gun control debate, but further behind. we have horrible shootings, we say we have to do something after gabby giffords then aurora. then after sandy hook, it got put on the agenda. climate change is moving that way, too. we keep saying after the explosions in louisiana we have to do something. we have to do something then, you know, hurricane sandy happens and it looks like finally we have reached that moment where we are going to do something. i don't know. i think it might take one more horrible environmental tragedy for it to get put on the agenda. >> we have done -- the fact the e.p.a. exists and it was created under richard nixon. as i was reading about it thinking about today, when he established the e.p.a., nixon said he wanted the
to see who can put the most lenient path forward if obama demands a smoother path to citizenship. let's make it as hard and as egregious as possible. wouldn't that work better? he questioned the political utility of a deal. not the part that involves human beings or anything. saying he reviews colorful research my friends indicating immigrants no longer came to better their lot through hard work but because they believed the government's source of prosperity. in short, they were not viable republicans. they were just moochers like the rest of us 47%. in addition to his fear that immigrants lack a basic sense of industry and responsibility, rush worried republicans will be falsely intact as intolerant because of the thing he said before that part. why would they be -- that's weird. that's crazy. [ cuckoo clock chimes ] >> stephanie: because he said he thinks you're too lazy and not hard working enough to be republicans. >> what did i say? >> stephanie: brown people are so sensitive. >> they lack some kind of chip. >> stephanie: sensitivity chip. >> something. >> stephanie: as jennifer
a latte will ya, please? >>> hi. we're back here at the table digesting president obama's big immigration speech in nevada and a couple of things that struck me. you know, one, i think we all are aware of the basic sort of political contours of this. historic losses cost the republican party the election. that could harm them for decades to come from something republican party leaders i think all realize has to happen here. can they get the rank and file to go along? i was checking twitter in the break that caught my attention. one of the leaders in the house, one out leaders of the conservative movement who helped kill immigration reform in 2006, 2007 is steve king from iowa. he's had some pretty harsh things to say about immigrants in the years and now an open senate seat in iowa thanks to the retirement of tom harkin and the point of questions asking luke in the last segment was, there is a difference of republicans running statewide where there is a real stigma to be a nativist and republicans running in the safely republican districts where the biggest threat is a challenge of the ri
's political "inconvenient truth" in the high gasoline prices help within gasoline prices help of in the direction of the most of the memo energy secretary steven chu said at the beginning of obama's term. we need to find someway to gasoline prices as high as europe. he's been criticized by republicans ever since. would you agree that is come of course politically inconvenient but also an open secret? >> i wouldn't say that. don't forget that the first thing that happens when prices go up is people downsize. they get smaller vehicles, and that's not a vote for more technology. or a shift to different fuels. it's kind of reality. so don't forget consumers have incredible -- that's hard job is to provide them with a choice, with good products that meet their needs. but it's, the idea that we're going to final consumers into some policy driven choices here i think is a little overly optimistic. >> i would add to this as well, the other half of the equation, the other half of the question is what can we do as automakers? you know, trying to innovate, trying to reduce costs, trying
enough for him, bill, to defeat the republicans politically or even based on policy which you would expect from any president. for president obama it is about pounding the republican party into oblivion. bill: let me talk about how republicans react to this in a moment, monica. emily, get on record, what do you think about the dustbin of history from speaker boehner? >> i think it is disappointing john boehner would go to the extreme talking points. he has not always been an extreme guy. he has been in the house for a long time. look to president obama, look actually at his record. when we moved into the sequester fight in early december, the first thing out of president obama's mouth he would look at any good idea regardless who it came from. he has consistent history of trying to work across the aisle. bill: does he now? bipartisan? >> the ideas that he a lick tated in the inauguration speech, those are american values. these are not traditionally democratic values. republicans used to be able to talk about these issues. it is really the republican party that has left the center,
eight years of the obama presidency is ignorant of american history and the greater challenges we have faced. what we need are political leaders who will clearly and boldly state the case for reform. if that means blocking obama's agenda or passing our reforms and have obama explain why he is opposed to them. we should articulate our goals and policy programmings and explain them. >> tom cotton of arkansas. [applause] >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. i'm the director of the at the heritage society. welcome to our conversation about life. it is strategically timed on this 40th anniversary on the infamous roe v. wade decision. hundreds of thousands of people gathered on the mall to march for life. thank you for standing for life. a generation and a half have grown up in the shadow of roe. we are thankful for those pro life leaders who have cast life into the darkness created by the ethic of roe. today, we are joined we -- by foreof the lights. chuck donovon is the president of the institute. chuck has served the pro life cause at the national right to life committee in the reagan
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)